All posts tagged: Hong Kong

Prominent Artists Headline Bonhams Hong Kong Modern And Contemporary Art Sale This November

Lot 10 – Kishio Suga (b. 1944), Inside and Out of Lattice, oil paint and wood panels,149 x 133 x 8 cm, 1990. (HK$300,000 – 500,000) Zeng Fanzhi, Zao Wou Ki, Hsiao Chin, Key Hiraga, KAWS and Kishio Suga are among the line-up of sought after artists featured in Bonhams 39-lot sale for Modern and Contemporary Art on 21 Novemberin Hong Kong, created to appeal to the global artworld.  The cover lot is a rare piece by Kishio Suga (b.1944), a leading member of Mono-Ha, a group of Japanese artists prolific during the late 60s and early 70s that aimed to challenge the traditional concepts of art. In this post Mono-Ha piece, Inside and Out of Lattice, painted in 1990 (estimate HK$300,000 – 500,000), the work reflects the spirit of this movement as the artist’s interest in using every day materials to explore a dynamic relationship between the materials and the negative space around them. Lot 22 – Zao Wou Ki (1921 – 2013), Dordogne, oil on canvas, 46 x 61 cm, 1954. (HK$ 4,000,000 – 6,000,000) A strong …

Do Ho Suh

Passage/s Lehmann Maupin Hong Kong Mar 20 – May 13, 2017 Margot Mottaz Every now and then you encounter an artist who resonates so deeply with you that they become a reference against which you assess all others. Do Ho Suh is one of them for me. I first discovered his work at his first Hong Kong solo exhibition, here at Lehmann Maupin, when his ongoing Specimen Series, small apartment fixtures and appliances replicated in translucent nylon, were displayed there in December 2013. Many artists tackle questions of home, displacement and personal space, but few do it with as much finesse, simplicity and beauty as Suh. Initially as a result of his move from his native South Korea to the US in the 1990s, his work seeks to apprehend the fundamental question of belonging and by extension identity. Now based in London with his family, his endeavour has remained the same but the premise has developed to include the complexity of fatherhood. His daughters played a key role in the creation of each work in …

Art in the Bar, 14 September, 6 pm

Locations Cobo House  I  Duddell’s  I  Halcyon  I  Ping Pong  I  Potato Head  I  Runway  I  Salon 10  I  Shore I  Tartine I  The Pawn     Artists Adrian Wong (Hong Kong) I  Melati Suryodarmo (Indonesia) I  Chen Tianzhuo (China) I  Morgan Wong (Hong Kong) I  Chim↑Pom (Japan) I  Rabbya Naseer and Hurmat Ul Ain (Pakistan) I  Come Inside (Hong Kong) I  Samson Young (Hong Kong) I  Deng Dafei (China) I  Tao Hui (China) I  Erkka Nissinen (Hong Kong based) I  The Utopia Group (China) I  Hu Weiyi (China) I  Tromarama (Indonesia) I  Korakrit Arunanondchai (Thailand) I  Wong Ping (Hong Kong) I  Li Ming (China) I  Xu Qu (China) About Asian video art will take over Hong Kong’s hottest bars for one night only this September when CoBo Social, Asia’s first online and offline art community platform, presents Art in the Bar. On 14 September (Thursday) from 6pm onwards, Art in the Bar will take place across 11 of the city’s hottest bars, who will team up with CoBo Social to offer special promotions, performances and screenings of cutting-edge video art. Art in the Bar aims to introduce the best of Asian video art to diverse audiences by bringing art directly to the community. The …

David Lam, Carrie Koo, Paul Chu, Josh Hon

Pacific Crossings: Hong Kong  Artists in Vancouver Vancouver Art Gallery Mar 4 – May 28, 2017 Elliat Albrecht Pacific Crossings: Hong Kong Artists in Vancouver (March 4–May 28) was one of three exhibitions organised by the Vancouver Art Gallery (VAG) this year to mark the 20th anniversary of the territory’s handover from the UK to China in 1997. Presented on half a floor of the gallery, an authoritative-looking former courthouse in the centre of the city, the exhibition was staged by the VAG’s Institute of Asian Art and comprised archival documents and art works by Paul Chui, Josh Hon, Carrie Koo and David Lam, who all emigrated from Hong Kong to Vancouver during the uncertain years leading up to the handover. Curator Diana Freundl positioned the show in the catalogue as illustrating the early stages of abstract and modern landscape painting in Hong Kong in the 1960s, as well as the performance and installation art of the 1980s. Freundl argued that with the growth of globalisation and commercialisation in the second half of the 20th century, Hong Kong’s artistic developments matched …

Samson Young

Songs for Disaster Relief Venice Biennale 2017 May 13 – Nov 26, 2017 Diana d’Arenberg Parmanand With over a decade of practice, artist Samson Young has made audiences question and examine their relationship to sound and music, and their relationship to history, politics and identity through sound. Young is a product of a certain time and place. Born in 1979 in Hong Kong, he grew up under British colonial rule in the city, and moved with his family to Sydney after the handover to China in 1997, fearing the worst of Chinese rule in Hong Kong less than a decade after the Tiananmen Square massacre. In the 20 years since the handover, the people of Hong Kong have constantly reassessed what it means to be a Hongkonger, and are undergoing the self-scrutiny of a nation whose identity is in flux. Trained in classical music composition, and generally described as a sound artist, Young has explored the relationship between mainland China and Hong Kong by recording sounds in the border area separating the two, arranging them into sonic compositions and then transcribing them in graphic …

Lee Kit

Something You Can’t Leave Behind By Charlotte Chang The introduction to Lee Kit’s first solo show with Massimo De Carlo Hong Kong, Something You Can’t Leave Behind, opens with a lengthy quote containing sentence fragments and abrupt imperatives that is at once baffling and transcendent. After a series of disjointed declarative statements – such as “there is a movie in every corner”, “a bus ride might make you smile” and “our time has gone” – Lee commands viewers to “mute the voiceover”, before ending by saying “something you can’t leave behind”, the show’s titular reference to elusive and ineffable but persistent traces of life and memory. The intimate narrative of the show, composed of eight site-specific works with complex combinations of projections and Lee’s characteristic mixed-media paintings and drawings, is as much a stream of consciousness as the quote. While the show’s “something” seems intertwined with Lee’s individual consciousness, manifest in ghostly imprints of mundane objects, disembodied gestures and idiosyncratic expletives, the multifarious interplay between tangibility and intangibility, light and shadow, sharpness and blurriness, and contrasting scales brings out something more universal: that, in myriad ways, …

Hi! Houses A rejuvenation of Hong Kong heritage

In Hong Kong many heritage buildings have been destroyed or neglected, and the government has only had a heritage-preservation policy since very recently. Its Art Promotion Office invited four Hong Kong artists to revitalise four centuries-old houses in different corners of the territory, using art as a subtle but powerful tool to link the past with the present and revive collective memory. The exhibitions recall in particular the Hakka heritage of Hong Kong, the commercial prosperity of the city during the 19th century and its role during the overthrow of the Qing Dynasty through the figure of Sun Yat-sen. All the heritage buildings connect Hong Kong with the history of China from different perspectives, at a time when the question of identity is particularly strongly contested. The artists’ research involved meeting descendants of the clans, neighbours, guards and village elders, in order to collect micro-histories, which they mixed with their own stories and historical events. They thus became storytellers, weaving fiction and reality to transform archives, empty walls and facts into vivid contemporary experiences. The cultural heritage consists not …

Tang Kwok Hin

Born and educated in Hong Kong, Tang Kwok Hin keeps questioning his background, and systematically looks with suspicion at the immediate environment around him. A conceptual artist and a very fine draughtsman, he uses ready-mades and collages with the aim of decomposing reality, mixing fiction with in-depth research and personal stories. After concentrating on everyday objects, which he tried to deprive of the social meanings and functions attached to them, he has recently expanded his exploration of the discrepancy between objects’ packaging and their contents to the whole of society, considering rules, laws and traditions as wrappings and containers, allowing for very different contents. Artomity: When we met after the Umbrella Movement, you said that you felt your practice had to become more political. Two years later, and after Needs, a solo show at Gallery Exit that functioned almost like a retrospective, how has the movement affected your work? Tang Kwok Hin: This exhibition helped me review my path of growth in life and art.Somehow my practice shifted very quickly after the events in order to respond …

Adrian Wong

The Tiger Returns to the Mountain By Charlotte Chang Reconstituting a Palimpsest of Hong Kong History Chinese-American artist Adrian Wong’s site-specific installation The Tiger Returns to the Mountain, presented at chi art space by the K11 Art Foundation, takes the former Tiger Balm Garden as its locus of imagination in deconstructing Hong Kong’s cultural history. The historic garden, on whose site a luxury residential complex now stands, is a palimpsest of Hong Kong’s cultural history — a site whose every reincarnation throughout the previous decades, whether as private residence, theme park or repository of psychedelic statuary, has effaced its own past while leaving indelible marks, tracing the city’s existence from colonial times to the present. The title alludes to a Chinese expression that means “allowing someone dangerous to roam again”, but the titular tiger’s identity is left ambiguous. As viewers navigate the large-scale work, which mixes multi-sensory and Chinese architectural elements, they are invited to consider this question while engaging with Hong Kong’s layered history from different vantage points. Artomity: How does the installation take advantage of chi art space’s …

Art Central returns to the Central Harbourfront Hong Kong on March 21-25 [preview and first night March 20].

Now in its third edition, Art Central is a place of discovery and a platform for high-quality works by established names to be exhibited alongside cutting-edge works by emerging artists. Staged within a 108,000 sqft architect-designed structure, the strong gallery line-up is complemented by a dynamic five-day programme that includes interactive installations, experimental films and performances, and engaging panel discussions, as well as food from some of Hong Kong’s hottest eateries. One of the most anticipated events on the city’s cultural calendar, Art Central has firmly established itself as an unmissable event during Hong Kong Art Week. Ticketing information Tickets are available in advance or on the door: www.ticketflap.com/artcentral Save 20% on general entry and concession tickets by using the code ARTOMITY17* Opening hours VIP preview (by invitation only)   Monday, March 20, 3 – 5pm First night  Monday, March 20, 5 – 9pm General opening hours Tuesday, March 21, 12 – 5pm Wednesday, March 22, 12 – 5pm Thursday, March 23, 12 – 9pm Friday, March 24, 12 – 7pm Saturday, March 25, 11am – 7pm artcentralhongkong.com …