All posts tagged: Hong Kong

Claire Lee

The Awakening  Charbon Art Space Hong Kong Oct 14 – Nov 11 Caroline Ha Thuc Claire Lee’s new series, which she started in early 2016, pertains to the figure of the bison, a species on the brick of extinction. The artist doesn’t question the bison’s perception but rather follows an anthropomorphic approach, using the mighty but fragile body of the animal to reflect on our human condition. The series needs to be contemplated as a whole, and the setting itself is part of the work. At the back of the gallery, sheets of poetry have been hung on the branches of trees, recalling shamanic prayer trees. Visitors can sit there and listen to the artist’s voice reading some of her poems. Most of the drawings are unframed, hung slightly away from the walls as if floating, or laid on rough wooden tables. The installation, in black, white and wood colours, creates an ethereal feeling and invites meditation. Lee’s drawings constantly play with the juxtaposition of calmness and sorrow, violence and healing, as she grabs the ephemeral …

Crossing Hong Kong’s Harbour

By John Batten The very first art objects mass-exported from China to buyers in Europe, Asia and the Ottoman Empire were designed-to-order, ceramic and porcelain chinoiserie items, often purely utilitarian: crockery dinner sets, jars and storage urns. In the 18th century worldwide trade expanded due to growing demand, sturdier ships and established trading routes. Canton, as Guangzhou was then known, was China’s only port open for foreign trade, and encouraged by the success of the porcelain trade the earliest China Trade paintings were created there. This established the practice for visiting European traders and military personnel to buy or commission a painting as a souvenir of their visit or an export product. Executed by Chinese artisan painters, China Trade paintings were completed in a western landscape painting style, often naive and using rudimentary perspective. The paintings focused on depicting Canton life, including factories, trading houses, foreign diplomatic quarters, landscape scenes and visiting ships – subjects that appealed to Europeans. The monopoly on British trade with India and China held by the British East India Company for more than two centuries ended …

David Zwirner Hong Kong Inaugural Exhibition by Michaël Borremans

Michaël Borremans: Fire from the Sun Jan 27 to Mar 10, 2018 Opening Reception: 6-8pm, Saturday, Jan 27, 2018 David Zwirner is pleased to present an exhibition of new paintings by Michaël Borremans, inaugurating the gallery’s space in Hong Kong. The exhibition will be the artist’s first solo show in Hong Kong and his sixth overall with David Zwirner. Fire from the Sun includes small and large scale works that feature toddlers engaged in playful but mysterious acts with sinister overtones and insinuations of violence. The children are presented alone or in groups against a studio-like backdrop that negates time and space, while underlining the theatrical atmosphere and artifice that exists throughout Borremans’s recent work.  Reminiscent of cherubs in Renaissance paintings, the toddlers appear as allegories of the human condition, their archetypal innocence contrasted with their suggested deviousness. Other paintings in the exhibition depict obscure machines, whose enigmatic presence appears foreboding in the context of the toddlers and suggests an element of scientific experimentation. Borremans has gained worldwide recognition for his innovative approach to painting. Combining technical mastery …

Art Partners

Meet the three women behind some of Hong Kong’s most ambitious large-scale public exhibitions. On a recent December afternoon at the Ladies’ Recreation Club, three women gathered to discuss art. They were passionate, vocal and slightly stunned at the speed with which their lives have shifted. For Levina Li-Cadman, Sarah Pringle and Vita Wong-Kwok, art is not about recreation. This is a high-octane, professional partnership, reflected in the name they chose when they launched their company exactly a year ago: Art-Partners.  The core founder was Li-Cadman, whose background is in luxury-goods and media marketing. In 2003, when the Financial Times launched its Asia edition in Hong Kong, her job was to build its relationships with high-end clients. One of these was Christie’s, and she was subsequently asked to become the auction house’s Asia-Pacific director of business development.  After that, she began consulting for White Cube and for the Royal Academy of Arts in London. As Hong Kong’s second Art Basel fair approached in May 2014, the Peninsula hotel was keen to demonstrate its artistic sensibilities through an …

Tang Contemporary Art Hong Kong

Grand Opening Huang Yongping & Shen Yuan – “Hong Kong Foot” Dec 20, 2017 – Jan 27, 2018 Hong Kong New Space: 10/F, H Queen’s, 80 Queen’s Road Central, Hong Kong Opening Reception: Wednesday, December 20, 2017, 6 – 8 pm Tang Contemporary Art is proud to announce a new exhibition for Huang Yongping and Shen Yuan, entitled “Hong Kong Foot,” which will be shown from December 20, 2017 to January 27, 2018 at Tang Contemporary Art’s new tenth-floor space in H Queen’s.   This exhibition will present three new works by Huang Yongping — Les Consoles de Jeu Souveraines, H.K/La Peau de Chagrin, and Wax Seal — as well as Shen Yuan’s Yellow Umbrella/Parasol. The works exhibited have no direct relationship to the title, but the title does reflect the artists’ interest in Hong Kong’s regional politics. “Hong Kong foot” is the Chinese colloquial name for a fungal infection of the foot, because early Western missionaries noted that many people in Hong Kong had this condition. When Hong Kong was ceded to the British, many British soldiers also contracted this infection. Even …

Prominent Artists Headline Bonhams Hong Kong Modern And Contemporary Art Sale This November

Lot 10 – Kishio Suga (b. 1944), Inside and Out of Lattice, oil paint and wood panels,149 x 133 x 8 cm, 1990. (HK$300,000 – 500,000) Zeng Fanzhi, Zao Wou Ki, Hsiao Chin, Key Hiraga, KAWS and Kishio Suga are among the line-up of sought after artists featured in Bonhams 39-lot sale for Modern and Contemporary Art on 21 Novemberin Hong Kong, created to appeal to the global artworld.  The cover lot is a rare piece by Kishio Suga (b.1944), a leading member of Mono-Ha, a group of Japanese artists prolific during the late 60s and early 70s that aimed to challenge the traditional concepts of art. In this post Mono-Ha piece, Inside and Out of Lattice, painted in 1990 (estimate HK$300,000 – 500,000), the work reflects the spirit of this movement as the artist’s interest in using every day materials to explore a dynamic relationship between the materials and the negative space around them. Lot 22 – Zao Wou Ki (1921 – 2013), Dordogne, oil on canvas, 46 x 61 cm, 1954. (HK$ 4,000,000 – 6,000,000) A strong …

Do Ho Suh

Passage/s Lehmann Maupin Hong Kong Mar 20 – May 13, 2017 Margot Mottaz Every now and then you encounter an artist who resonates so deeply with you that they become a reference against which you assess all others. Do Ho Suh is one of them for me. I first discovered his work at his first Hong Kong solo exhibition, here at Lehmann Maupin, when his ongoing Specimen Series, small apartment fixtures and appliances replicated in translucent nylon, were displayed there in December 2013. Many artists tackle questions of home, displacement and personal space, but few do it with as much finesse, simplicity and beauty as Suh. Initially as a result of his move from his native South Korea to the US in the 1990s, his work seeks to apprehend the fundamental question of belonging and by extension identity. Now based in London with his family, his endeavour has remained the same but the premise has developed to include the complexity of fatherhood. His daughters played a key role in the creation of each work in …

Art in the Bar, 14 September, 6 pm

Locations Cobo House  I  Duddell’s  I  Halcyon  I  Ping Pong  I  Potato Head  I  Runway  I  Salon 10  I  Shore I  Tartine I  The Pawn     Artists Adrian Wong (Hong Kong) I  Melati Suryodarmo (Indonesia) I  Chen Tianzhuo (China) I  Morgan Wong (Hong Kong) I  Chim↑Pom (Japan) I  Rabbya Naseer and Hurmat Ul Ain (Pakistan) I  Come Inside (Hong Kong) I  Samson Young (Hong Kong) I  Deng Dafei (China) I  Tao Hui (China) I  Erkka Nissinen (Hong Kong based) I  The Utopia Group (China) I  Hu Weiyi (China) I  Tromarama (Indonesia) I  Korakrit Arunanondchai (Thailand) I  Wong Ping (Hong Kong) I  Li Ming (China) I  Xu Qu (China) About Asian video art will take over Hong Kong’s hottest bars for one night only this September when CoBo Social, Asia’s first online and offline art community platform, presents Art in the Bar. On 14 September (Thursday) from 6pm onwards, Art in the Bar will take place across 11 of the city’s hottest bars, who will team up with CoBo Social to offer special promotions, performances and screenings of cutting-edge video art. Art in the Bar aims to introduce the best of Asian video art to diverse audiences by bringing art directly to the community. The …

David Lam, Carrie Koo, Paul Chu, Josh Hon

Pacific Crossings: Hong Kong  Artists in Vancouver Vancouver Art Gallery Mar 4 – May 28, 2017 Elliat Albrecht Pacific Crossings: Hong Kong Artists in Vancouver (March 4–May 28) was one of three exhibitions organised by the Vancouver Art Gallery (VAG) this year to mark the 20th anniversary of the territory’s handover from the UK to China in 1997. Presented on half a floor of the gallery, an authoritative-looking former courthouse in the centre of the city, the exhibition was staged by the VAG’s Institute of Asian Art and comprised archival documents and art works by Paul Chui, Josh Hon, Carrie Koo and David Lam, who all emigrated from Hong Kong to Vancouver during the uncertain years leading up to the handover. Curator Diana Freundl positioned the show in the catalogue as illustrating the early stages of abstract and modern landscape painting in Hong Kong in the 1960s, as well as the performance and installation art of the 1980s. Freundl argued that with the growth of globalisation and commercialisation in the second half of the 20th century, Hong Kong’s artistic developments matched …

Samson Young

Songs for Disaster Relief Venice Biennale 2017 May 13 – Nov 26, 2017 Diana d’Arenberg Parmanand With over a decade of practice, artist Samson Young has made audiences question and examine their relationship to sound and music, and their relationship to history, politics and identity through sound. Young is a product of a certain time and place. Born in 1979 in Hong Kong, he grew up under British colonial rule in the city, and moved with his family to Sydney after the handover to China in 1997, fearing the worst of Chinese rule in Hong Kong less than a decade after the Tiananmen Square massacre. In the 20 years since the handover, the people of Hong Kong have constantly reassessed what it means to be a Hongkonger, and are undergoing the self-scrutiny of a nation whose identity is in flux. Trained in classical music composition, and generally described as a sound artist, Young has explored the relationship between mainland China and Hong Kong by recording sounds in the border area separating the two, arranging them into sonic compositions and then transcribing them in graphic …