All posts tagged: Gagosian

Howard Hodgkin

In the Pink Gagosian Gallery Hong Kong Jan 19 – Mar 11, 2017 By Diana d’Arenberg Parmanand I never interviewed Howard Hodgkin, who passed away on March 9 aged 84. The artist didn’t like to talk about his paintings, or attempt to explain them into relevance, although for the purpose of this review I’m going to do just that. Hodgkin’s paintings aren’t about narrative or words. He didn’t paint figuratively, nor was his work grounded in the conceptual or the ideological. What he did was more transcendent. He brought the interior world of memory and emotion to life with colour, making that which can’t be articulated tangible and physical through paint. One of the UK’s most celebrated painters, Hodgkin’s career spanned 50 years and included winning the Turner Prize in 1985 and representing Britain at the 1984 Venice Biennale. But In the Pink, his first and only exhibition at Gagosian Hong Kong, from January 19 to March 11 – featuring 23 paintings, mostly small in size, that play with varied formal elements – was suggestive …

Anish Kapoor

Gagosian Gallery, Hong Kong, Sep 12 – Nov 5, 2016 By Ellen Oredsson Anish Kapoor’s recent solo exhibition at the Gagosian, his first in Hong Kong, serves as both an introduction to his oeuvre and a subversion of it. The exhibition guides us through works from the past decade, starting with Kapoor’s iconic mirrored surfaces and moving into new, ongoing explorations of sculpture and sensory experiences. Entering the gallery, Mirror (Black) (2014) hits the viewer with the sheer force of its materiality. In this first section, reflective surfaces highlight the interaction between subject and object, with Mirror’s dark, concave facade destabilising perspective. Similarly, Vertigo (2006), a large mirrored wave, dominates the gallery with its warped convex/concave structure, reflecting distorted images back at the viewer. More unassuming is Right Angle Triangle Twist (2016), a smaller work that takes the warped mirror of Vertigo and keeps twisting it, confronting the viewer’s sense of space and reality. The exhibition’s second section illustrates a new direction in Kapoor’s art, with heavy slabs of stone lying on the floor. Compared to Kapoor’s immaculate mirrored surfaces, they are imperfect: corners …