Month: February 2017

Art Upon an Island

Art Upon an Island, an exhibition organised by the Hong Kong Museum of Art, takes place until March 28 in the Exhibition Hall, 1/F, Low Block, Hong Kong City Hall. It features installations that demonstrate the artistic journey of two outstanding Hong Kong artists, taking visitors away from the hustle and bustle of the city to relax by the sea and delight in a thought-provoking experience of nature. As the name suggests, Art Upon an Island takes islands as its theme, with the artists travelling Hong Kong’s outlying islands. Through the art installations, the artists have established connections with visitors, making art part of their daily lives. The exhibition takes place at the same time as Art Basel, and the organisers hope to deepen global understanding of Hong Kong art by introducing alternative arts that audiences from around the world do not often see in the mainstream art market. The exhibition features the works 15.6 Creator Daily by Cheung Chi-wai and 107 No Man Islands by Simon Wan. In 2014 Cheung Chi-wai established Minim, a minimal space at the seaside on …

There are no misinterpretations of nothing

By Winnie Lai Artist Tsang Kin Wah represented Hong Kong in last year’s Venice Biennale and has brought home a continuation of his quest for life’s ultimate meaning at the M+ Pavilion. This time the exhibition programme also includes the Misguided Tours, in which three curators who have previously worked with Tsang shared their alternative interpretations of the work. After The Infinite Nothing in Venice, nothing in Hong Kong takes the artist’s attempt to realise endlessness and perpetuity to another level. This time he wants to visualise and present nothingness: a personal visualisation of being under a nihilistic spell, and a manifestation of responses to realising the futility of life. It isn’t a straightforward or light-hearted work to digest. The Misguided Tours are an effort to counter the idea that there is an official way to understand art. Everyone has a blind spot; other people’s perspectives can dispel preconceptions and expand the understanding of a work. Tsang, a fan of Nietzsche, who famously said that ‘There are no facts, only interpretations’, would agree. nothing is the first show at the M+ Pavilion, …

Julieta

Director: Pedro Almodóvar Cast: Adriana Ugarte, Emma Suárez, Daniel Grao Spain, 99 minutes Venue: General release By Elizabeth Kerr There are few non-ironic old-school formalists working in cinema today, and Spanish filmmaker Pedro Almodóvar continues to be the world’s most unabashed. An avowed fan of the lurid — in physical space, in theme and in his characters — Almodóvar has also never been one to shy away from pastiche. His latest, Julieta, based on the short stories Chance, Soon, and Silence from Canadian writer Alice Munro’s Runaway collection, blends Almodóvar’s hallmarks to somewhat middling effect taken as a whole. But he’s such an aesthete and so genuine in his storytelling that it’s easy to get caught up in his melodrama. Julieta is a classic, Firkin women’s picture, an outmoded and intensely mid-century form, but one Almodóvar has long given a modern veneer. The film builds a primary colour-coded portrait of Julieta (Adriana Ugarte in youth, Emma Suárez in middle age) as a young woman, daughter, wife, mother and widow. As a student, Julieta meets a dashing Galician fisherman, Xoan (Daniel Grao), …

Mina Park

Para Site director and arts patron Mina Park discusses her favourite works from her collection. Lee Kit was the first young Hong Kong artist Park heard of before she moved to Hong Kong in 2010; when she moved here she sought his work out, after first seeing images of it in the book for the 2009 show Younger than Jesus at New York’s New Museum. In some ways her relationship with his work tracks her relationship with Hong Kong. In 2011 she visited his solo show at Osage Gallery in Kwun Tong, and remembers vividly spending the entire afternoon with gallerist Jade Ouk, learning more about the pieces in the show and talking about how they had both adjusted to life in Hong Kong. In 2013 Park visited Lee’s exhibition when he represented Hong Kong at the Venice Biennale, and saw his paintings on wood, in this case small ones, for the first time. There is an often-discussed residual quality to his work that is very palpable to her; some of his pieces refer to a presence that is no …

Mill6

Warm Up, the latest programme organised by non-profit art organisation Mill6 Foundation, had some ambitious objectives: revitalising handicrafts, passing on Hong Kong’s cultural heritage, fostering neighbourhood connections, bridging the gap between generations, and reviving knowledge of textiles and garments. Caroline Ha Thuc speaks to the foundation’s director Angelika Li and curator Him Lo. What was your vision for the event, and how do you deal with so many topics and communities at the same time? Angelika Li: Mill6 is a unique establishment. It was once a factory space for textiles, and we are rejuvenating it to become, by 2018, a space for textile arts and culture, heritage and innovation. We are developing six different programmes and approaches: exhibitions, community engagement, learning, heritage, artist-in-residency and public art. We also have several different target audiences, as well as different partners and collaborators. With each project we must therefore consistently ask the questions: What are the purpose and the meaning? What cause does it serve? How can we be sustainable? What are the inherent values? Our focus is clearly …

Marco Brambilla

Theater Simon Lee Gallery Hong Kong, Sep 9 – Oct  4, 2016 By Diana d’Arenberg Parmanand The merry-go-round symphony of Prokofiev’s Cinderella Waltz sweeps you up into a dizzying vortex of imagery. Fragments of Hollywood films – culled from the The Sound of Music, The Big Lebowski, Eyes Wide Shut, the Austin Powers films, The Terminator and more than 400 others – dance past in a frenetic choreographed collage of totemic tableaux depicting heaven and hell. Good and evil are informed by popular culture: a horned red devil and a fire-and-brimstone orgy of naked bodies writhing atop one another versus fluffy kittens, unicorns and Julie Andrews. You are still and weightless, floating in the middle of it all like an astronaut, watching the imagery orbit around you in a repetitive cycle that recalls Dante’s Divine Comedy juxtaposed with Charles and Ray Eames’ films Powers of Ten. This is Marco Brambilla’s Creation (2012), a four-minute virtual-reality spectacle. Visual whiplash is guaranteed. Virtual reality takes us beyond the confines of the television screen and right into that screen, broadening our sensory engagement with …

Amnesty International Hong Kong’s Carnival: bid for artworks at art4amnesty.hk

Curated by Hong Kong-based French curator Caroline Ha Thuc, Carnival is Amnesty International Hong Kong’s ambitious art project that incorporates an art exhibition, auction, performances, education programmes, and fundraising dinners to advocate for freedom of expression both in Hong Kong and around the world. All artworks will be auctioned using the Givergy platform from Feb 13, 2017, starting at 10am. Visit art4amnesty.hk to view and bid for all of Carnival’s exhibiting artworks. The auction ends on February 26, 2017, and up to 50% of the artwork sale will be shared with the contributing artists in order to acknowledge their generous support of Amnesty International Hong Kong’s human rights work. The art exhibition features more than 50 works from renowned local and international artists including Julian Opie, Martin Parr, Invader and Shepard Fairey. Over 20 of the artworks are exclusive to Carnival, and have never been exhibited before. The artists have used every kind of medium, from photography and painting through to engraving and installation. Their interpretations of the theme are also very diverse. Some have chosen to play with the absurd side of Carnival to produce satirical …

“New Territories” – exhibition by Charles Richardson at Floating Projects.

Charles Richardson (Visual artist, UK) will be showing a short film plus students’ outcomes of a 3D-scanning workshop he hosted at Floating Projects opening on Feb 11 at 4.30pm and ending on Feb 19, 2017. The artist will be present on Saturday Feb 11 for questions, or a chat and a drink, throughout the day. Richardson’s film/animation will be a partial look at some of the scans and footage from his 6 weeks working in Hong Kong on the Artist Mutual Support Scheme at Floating Projects. He has come to Hong Kong with support from the British Council and Arts Council England. He has treated Floating Projects as his study base, place of experimentation and discussion hub. Floating Projects 8d, Kwai Bo Industrial Building 40 Wong Chuk Hang Rd, Wong Chuk Hang Tuesday to Sunday 2 – 8pm (closed on Monday Feb 13) Charles Richardson (b.1979, Leek, UK) completed an MA in Fine Art at Slade School of Art in 2014. He was the winner of the 2014 Saatchi New Sensations prize for his video installation ‘Rehearsal’. Richardson had a solo exhibition at Cabin Gallery, …

Danh Vō

Solo show. White Cube, Hong Kong, Sep 7 – Nov 12, 2016 By Diana d’Arenberg Parmanand What do demonic possession, Pleistocene mammoth bones, a crusader sword and a Budweiser carton have in common? On first appearances, nothing at all. By installing them across two floors in White Cube Gallery, Vietnamese-Danish artist Danh Vō seems to be playing a practical joke on his audience. On the ground floor sits the installation Lick me, Lick me – a quote from the film The Exorcist (1973) – comprising a fragment of a Roman marble sculpture from the first century AD placed atop a modern refrigerator encasing a French wooden sculpture of Christ from the 16th century. Several metres away, on the floor against the wall, is a gold-leafed Budweiser carton. It looks like forgotten debris from a gallery cocktail party, but peering inside reveals gold fragments of the stars and stripes. A handwritten letter by 19th-century French missionary Jean Theophane Vénard – copied expertly in beautiful calligraphy by Vo’s father – hangs at the bottom of a staircase. Vénard was sent to Vietnam …