Month: January 2017

Ho Sin Tung

Dusty Landscape Chambers Fine Art, Beijing, Sep 17 – Nov 20, 2016 By Nooshfar Afnan Visitors entering Ho Sin Tung’s exhibition at Chambers Fine Art in Beijing are confronted with posters like those hung outside Hong Kong cinemas. For the Hong Kong artist’s first solo show in mainland China, she has chosen two types of custom-made frames in a variety of colours to hold these posters and emphasise the idea that they advertise movies. On closer inspection, however, the posters, executed with coloured pencil on tea-stained paper, are revealed to promote fictional movies, mainly horror. For example When the Triangle Descends the Stairs (2016) pays homage to Hitchcock’s Psycho, including its famous shower scene, the large house and its stairwell. With her dry sense of humour, Ho replaces the murderer with a geometric form, a triangle, raising the question of fear of the unknown. “A horror film always reaches its climax and ending at the moment when the unknown reveals itself,” she says. “But what if a triangle descends the stairs? The unknown and the known will arrive at the …

“Shifting Objectives : Design from the M+ Collection” – exhibition & members-only preview

November 23, 2016 At the end of this month, M+’s debut design exhibition Shifting Objectives: Design from the M+ Collection opens at the M+ Pavilion. Featuring more than 120 key objects and works dating from the 1930s until now – including mid-twentieth century Japanese furniture, familiar products from Hong Kong’s manufacturing heyday, drones, ‘copied’ goods, and digitally-enabled and open-source practices – this groundbreaking show illustrates how design philosophy and practice has changed from the post-Second World War period until now. The exhibition explores the concepts and frameworks that have shaped and broadened our understanding of design and gives a glimpse of the growing M+ design collection, the first of its kind in Asia and a core pillar of the M+ collection. For more information please visit www.westkowloon.hk/en/shiftingobjectives Date: 30 November 2016 to 5 February, 2017* Time: 11am–6pm, Wednesday to Sunday and public holidays Venue: M+ Pavilion, West Kowloon Cultural District * Please note that on 25 December, 2016, 1 January, 28 January and 29 January, 2017, the exhibition will be closed. On 28 November, M+ will hold …

Belgium Week Brings Vibrant Belgian Art Scene to Hong Kong

November 12 to 19 Belgium Week is proud to showcase a wide range of contemporary Belgian art and artists at KEE Club and ArtOne in November, many showing in Hong Kong for the first time. The exhibitions are curated by Belgian Hong Kong resident Emilie Rolin Jacquemyns, who has brought together a varied collection of artists from galleries in Belgium and overseas, as well as private collections, notably from within Hong Kong. One of the countries with the highest number of art collectors per capita, Belgium is fast becoming a contemporary-art hotspot, and the work presented throughout the week will showcase both established and exciting new artists from Belgium whose works reflect the country: rich in culture and artistic expression. Three artists out of the thirteen exhibiting at KEE Club are Harold Ancart, Ann Veronica Janssens and Sophie Whettnall. Ancart, recently nominated by the Financial Times as one of this year’s hot names, was born in Brussels but now lives and works in New York, and will be presenting an untitled piece. Using space and repetition for his architectural installations and works on paper, his …

Tsang Kin-Wah: Nothing at M+ Pavilion

October 6, 2016 The M+ Pavilion, the first venue to be completed in the West Kowloon Cultural District, opened to the public with its inaugural exhibition Tsang Kin-Wah: Nothingearlier last month. The solo show by renowned local artist Tsang Kin-Wah is a continuation and expansion of the artist’s widely acclaimed 2015 presentation The Infinite Nothing at the 56th Venice Biennale. Nothing draws on philosophy, literature, religion, and popular culture references and presents a site-specific, immersive installation of text, sound, and video projections. Make the most of your visit to the exhibition with a series of free programmes, including ‘Misguided’ Tours led by curators that have worked with Tsang at significant points in his career, and gallery tours led by M+ curators. Watch the exhibition trailer here for a sneak peek. Date: 9/9–6/11/2016 Opening Hours: 11am–6pm, Wednesday to Sunday and public holidays M+ Pavilion, West Kowloon Cultural District For further information, please visit http://www.westkowloon.hk/nothing ‘Misguided’ Tours In these tours, curators who have worked with Tsang Kin-Wah share anecdotes and insights about the artist and his practice, offering a rare opportunity to hear alternative readings …

G Roland Biermann

Transformations By Malcolm MacLeod The works of German-born, London-based photographer G Roland Biermann inhabit a space that flirts with reality, but really exists somewhere between our realm and the surreal. Transformations, his Hong Kong debut exhibition at Galerie du Monde, reveals a thematic concentration on uncertainty and the grey areas of existence, and how we humans interact with these spaces as both individuals and societies. In a city like Hong Kong, where green places mingle with high rises, and the pavements swell with workers glued to their phones, Biermann’s undefined worlds carry a poignant message. The works in the exhibition belong to three projects from between 2009 and 2016. The first chronologically, Apparitions (2009), depicts ghostly figures and objects inhabiting carefully curated spaces of Biermann’s imagining. These compositions resist traditional narratives and are rife with contrasts, making them an ideal jumping-off point for the exploration of metaphysical questions that is a consistent feature of Biermann’s oeuvre. Shown in groups of between two and five, they echo the diptychs and triptychs of medieval Christian art, or even the folding panels …

Wang Du

Post-Fetishism  Tang Contemporary, Hong Kong, Oct 1 – 29, 2016 By Elliat Albrecht At first glance they can make you blush. The fleshy, carnal texture of Wang Du’s works at Tang Contemporary is at once erotic and almost repulsive, like seeing the back of a stranger’s thighs up close. For his exhibition Post-Fetishism, the Chinese artist presents five recent charcoal drawings surrounded by pale silica frames implanted with thousands of individual synthetic hairs. The large-scale pictures are close-up views of contemporary fetishised objects: Apple headphones, stylish sunglasses, a cork from a 2004 French wine, a cigar cutter depicted in such large scale that it resembles a guillotine. On the floor are models of a child-size car, a Rimowa suitcase, a wonky skyscraper and an AK-47 made of a peach-coloured gel that gallerist Shasha Tittmann described as “similar to that of breast implants”, each as whiskered as the picture frames on the wall. They look as if they would wobble and shake if pushed. The works are numbered rather than named to draw attention away from the objects’ original functions. Born in 1956 …

Anish Kapoor

Gagosian Gallery, Hong Kong, Sep 12 – Nov 5, 2016 By Ellen Oredsson Anish Kapoor’s recent solo exhibition at the Gagosian, his first in Hong Kong, serves as both an introduction to his oeuvre and a subversion of it. The exhibition guides us through works from the past decade, starting with Kapoor’s iconic mirrored surfaces and moving into new, ongoing explorations of sculpture and sensory experiences. Entering the gallery, Mirror (Black) (2014) hits the viewer with the sheer force of its materiality. In this first section, reflective surfaces highlight the interaction between subject and object, with Mirror’s dark, concave facade destabilising perspective. Similarly, Vertigo (2006), a large mirrored wave, dominates the gallery with its warped convex/concave structure, reflecting distorted images back at the viewer. More unassuming is Right Angle Triangle Twist (2016), a smaller work that takes the warped mirror of Vertigo and keeps twisting it, confronting the viewer’s sense of space and reality. The exhibition’s second section illustrates a new direction in Kapoor’s art, with heavy slabs of stone lying on the floor. Compared to Kapoor’s immaculate mirrored surfaces, they are imperfect: corners …

A portrait of the artist as an emergency

In January 2016 Patrick Healy, Amsterdam based philosopher and artist, was invited by the School of Design [The Hong Kong Polytechnic University], to conduct a series of PhD and research seminars. With Patrick in Hong Kong for 3 weeks, and knowing him for a number of years, it provided us an ideal opportunity to – not only – reminisce about old times but use the lunch time discussion to understand how his philosophical position, artistic research and personal interest intersect. The following discussion was the result of this discussion exposing the man behind the philosopher in the process of becoming himself. By Gerhard Bruyns Artomity: You’re a philosopher, performance artist, painter, sculptor, educator and writer. When and how did you get the idea of combining art and philosophy? Patrick Healy: Well, during my studies of philosophy – at almost the very end of my formal studies – we started reading Nietzsche. In itself that was considered very daring because my teachers mostly specialised in metaphysics and medieval and ancient philosophy. So it was almost like …